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Juan Ignacio Blanco  

 

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Dennis Andrew NILSEN

 
 
 

 

Dennis Andrew Nilsen

 

 

Dennis Andrew Nilsen police photo.

 

 

Dennis Andrew Nilsen

 

 

Dennis Andrew Nilsen

 

 

Dennis Andrew Nilsen

 

 

Dennis Andrew Nilsen

 

 

Dennis Andrew Nilsen

 

 

Dennis Andrew Nilsen

 

 

Dennis Andrew Nilsen

 

 

Dennis Andrew Nilsen

 

 

Dennis Andrew Nilsen

 

 

Dennis Andrew Nilsen

 

 

Dennis Andrew Nilsen

 

 

As soon as Nilsen was charged with murder, he was advised to accept a solicitor to represent him. Ronald Moss, who had dealt with murder cases before, but never anything on this scale,
accepted the task.

In the months leading up to the trial, Moss, a cheerful man of around 40, was put under increasing pressure by Nilson's erratic behaviour on remand. In april, Nilsen declared that he wished to discharge legal aid and defence himself. The magistate was sufficiently astonished to ask three times if he understood the implications of what he was doing. Soon after this, Nilsen re-applied for legal aid and Moss rejoined him.

 

 

Alan Green was the prosecutor. He maintained that Nilsen had killed in full awareness of what he was doing and should be found guilty of murder. His principal evidence was from Nilsen’s lengthy statement to the police, while the defense relied on psychiatric analysis. Green was disarmingly polite to Nilsen throughout the trial. His closing speech was powerful but free from invective drama.

 

 

A rebuttal psychiatrist was called, Dr. Paul Bowden, who had spent fourteen hours with Nilsen-much more than those doctors for the defense. He found no evidence for much of the testimony put forth by the other psychiatrists, and thought that Nilsen was manipulative. He did see Nilsen as a unique case, with a mental abnormality but not a mental disorder. His explanation of the difference was not very clear.

 

 

The second psychiatrist, Dr. Patrick Gallwey, diagnosed Nilsen with a “Borderline False Self As If Pseudo-Normal Narcissistic Personality Disorder.” He settled for a False Self Syndrome, which meant that Nilsen had occasional outbreaks of schizoid disturbances that he managed most of the time to keep at bay. Such a person is most likely to disintegrate under circumstances of social isolation.

 

 

The defense witness, Dr. James MacKeith, discussed the various aspects of unspecified personality disorder from which he believed Nilsen suffered. He then described how Nilsen had always had trouble expressing his feelings, and he always fled from relationships that had gone wrong.

 

 

 
 
 
 
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