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Randolph Franklin DIAL

 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 
 
 
Classification: Murderer
Characteristics: Murder for hire - Alcoholic sculptor - Escaped from prison with deputy warden's wife
Number of victims: 1 +
Date of murder: September 16, 1981
Date of arrest: May 1, 1986 (surrenders)
Date of birth: September 26, 1944
Victim profile: Kelly Dean Hogan (karate instructor)
Method of murder: Shooting
Location: Tulsa County, Oklahoma, USA
Status: Sentenced to life in prison on August 22, 1986. Escapes from prison in Granite, Oklahoma, on August 30, 1994. Taken into custody in Texas on April 4, 2005. Died in prison on June 13, 2007
 
 
 
 
 
 
photo gallery
 
 
 
 
 
 

Dial's story involves a series of events too strange for fiction.

In 1986, Dial, a gifted artist, confesses to the 1981 murder of Kelly Hogan. Dial is convicted in Tulsa County Case CRF-1986-1657 of First Degree Murder.

In 1994, Dial escapes from prison in Granite, Oklahoma. He abducts the deputy warden's wife, Bobbi Parker, and uses her van in the escape. The van is discovered two days later in Wichita Falls, Texas. Eight days later, Parker's family receives phone calls saying she will be home soon.

Over ten years later, a tip following a broadcast by the television show "America's Most Wanted" leads authorities to a secluded trailer house in Campti, Texas, where Dial and Parker were both residing and working on a chicken ranch. Dial and Parker both state that Parker was being held against her will based upon threats against her family.

Randolph Dial died of complications from lung cancer on June 13, 2007.

 
 

Randolph Franklin Dial - Bobbi Parker timeline

Sept. 16, 1981: Kelly Dean Hogan, a Tulsa karate instructor from Broken Arrow, is killed.

May 1, 1986: Randolph Franklin Dial surrenders to Ls Vegas police and confesses to Hogan's killing.

Aug. 11, 1986: Dial pleads guilty to murder and is sentenced to life in prison.

Aug. 30, 1994: Dial escapes with Bobbi Parker, the deputy warden's wife.

April 4, 2005: Dial is taken into custody in Texas. Parker is found with him.

June 13, 2007: Dial dies after illness.

April 4, 2008: Parker is charged with helping Dial escape.

 
 

Bobbi Parker trial delayed

By Ron Jackson - TulsaWorld.com

February 4, 2009

MANGUM — District Judge Richard Darby granted Bobbi Parker a continuance today in her long-awaited trial to determine whether she aided convicted murderer Randolph Franklin Dial in his 1994 escape from the Oklahoma State Reformatory in Granite.

Darby pushed the trial back to Greer County’s October docket much to the delight of Parker’s new, high-profile attorney Garvin Isaacs. He took charge of Parker’s case Dec. 3 when defense attorney Rick Cunningham of Alva voluntarily stepped aside, and immediately requested more time. State prosecutors and Isaacs will meet again Sept. 3 with the judge to determine an actual trial date.

Parker, 46, was charged with helping Dial escape April 4, 2008 — exactly three years after authorities found Dial and Parker living together on an east Texas chicken farm. In February, Parker pleaded not guilty to the charge.

“I did not have an adequate amount of time to review the evidence and interview witnesses,” Isaacs said. “For example, there is a six-hour tape of an interview with Bobbi (by the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation) that was inaudible. The state claims it has enhanced the sound on that tape, and just today provided me with a DVD copy.”

At Granite, Dial was classified as minimum security, despite the fact that he was serving a life sentence for the 1981 Tulsa murder of Kelly Dean Hogan, 28, of Broken Arrow.

Dial, who had been suffering from a heart problem, died in June 2007 at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary at McAlester.

Isaacs previously requested a continuance and detailed 77 different points of contention regarding the evidence. Assistant District Attorney Eric Yarborough disputed the motion, claiming Parker’s defense has had more than enough time to prepare for trial.

Isaacs said he is also disturbed that 15 strands of hair found in the getaway van have not been tested for DNA. The hair was reportedly discovered by Wichita Falls police on a brown strip of tape inside Dial’s abandoned van.

“They won’t do mitochondrial testing on the hair,” Isaacs claimed. “I don’t know why. If OSBI agent Robert Williams’ brother had been kidnapped by Dial, I guarantee he would want that hair tested. Something’s not right with that picture.

 
 

Randolph Dial dies in Prison

June 14, 2007

Randolph Franklin Dial was born on September 26, 1944 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. He died on June 13, 2007 at the maximum-security penitentiary in McAlester, Oklahoma, from complications involving lung cancer.

Dial was convicted in 1986 of first-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison for the 1981 murder of a Broken Arrow karate instructor. He is currently housed at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary at McAlester, according to the state Department of Corrections Web site.

Dial, a sculptor and painter with a master's degree in art, had obtained trusty status at the Oklahoma State Reformatory, meaning he could stay in minimum security housing outside the prison walls.

Dial ran an inmate pottery program with Bobbi Parker, used a kiln in the Parkers' garage and had full access to their home during the day. The morning of Bobbi Parker's disappearance, her husband saw Dial working in his garage as he left.

Law enforcement officers acting on a tip found Dial in a mobile home near Campti, Texas, in April 2005. Bobbi Parker was found nearby unharmed, working on a chicken farm. Dial fled the state prison with her.

 
 

Escapee Dies In Custody

Amw.com

June 14, 2007

For 10 years, Randolph Dial lived the the life of a fugitive with the warden's wife. But once in custody, the sickly murderer knew his time was short.

Oklahoma State Pentitentiary officials did not release Dial's cause of death but the one-time fugitive was known for having a problem with his heart.  The FBI closed their case against Bobbi Parker - ruling that she had been kidnapped and wasn't involved in helping Dial escape from prison.

Tip Leads Cops To Killer

A tip generated by America's Most Wanted in early 2005 led directly to the capture of Randolph Dial, a convicted killer who escaped from prison 11 years ago.  Police say a tipster saw Dial's face on AMW.COM, and knew he was working on a chicken farm. Dial had been serving a life sentence for the murder of a karate instructor when he disappeared from prison with the assistant warden's wife, Bobbi Parker.  Dial, 60, was found in East Texas working on a chicken ranch.  Cops say he was taken into custody without incident, but a loaded pistol was found on a nearby table.

Police considered Bobbi Parker an endangered missing person, worried that she had been kidnapped and held against her will by Dial.  She left behind her husband and two children.  After she disappeared, she contacted her family twice; both times saying that she would be home soon.  Parker was found on the chicken ranch with Dial, and appeared healthy and unharmed. She has since been questioned by police and reunited with her family.

Now, Dial has spoken out about his decade on the run. In a jailhouse interview shortly after his arrest, Dial said he took Bobbi Parker at knifepoint when he escaped. "I was a hostage-taker and will probably live to regret it," he said. "But now I don't. Doing a life sentence, at my age, I wouldn't trade it for the past 10 1/2 years."

Details are continuing to emerge about the relationship and experience of Dial and his captive, Bobbi Parker. Dial said their relationship was never romantic and that they lived in separate rooms. He likened Parker's relationship to him as "Stockholm Syndrome," where kidnapping victims become sympathetic to their captors over time, often out of fear of violence.

"She was living under the impression if she ever tried to get away, I would get away and I would make her regret it, particularly toward her family," Dial said. "I didn't mean it, but she didn't know that."

Residents of Campti tell AMW they thought something wasn't quite right about the pair over the years. They kept to themselves, never engaged in any personal conversations and avoided going to the nearby town of Center. Neighbors describe Bobbi as being very nice, but say Dial was cold and distant.

Their trailer is secluded, near a red dirt road and sitting on a wooded lot across from five long metal chicken houses. Neighbors tell AMW that Dial was often distrustful and hurried. They say that when cars would pull up near his trailer, Dial would almost always come out with a gun, demanding to know who was approaching and what they wanted.

As for their jobs, coworkers say Dial was fired from the chicken farm, and that he pressured Bobbi to take on extra hours to make up the difference. Neighbors say Bobbi would become nervous when asked why Dial wasn't working, and would often explain that his ailing health was the reason he couldn't work. But people who stopped by say Dial continued to work on his art projects at home while Bobbi toiled away in brutally hot conditions.

Dial was sentenced on February 2, 2007 to seven years for his escape from prison. This time has been added on top of his previous life sentence for murder.

 
 

Mystery of Missing Inmate and Woman Ends

Randolph Franklin Dial - murderer (of a karate instructor), escaped convict and kidnapper of the warden's wife

By Sylvia Moreno - The Washington Post

Thursday, April 7, 2005

AUSTIN -- Randolph Franklin Dial used to portray himself as the hero of his own novel, writing friends that he served in Vietnam as a member of Delta Force or that he was a CIA, Secret Service or FBI agent. He told others he was a hit man with Mafia connections.

What he was, in actuality, was an accomplished artist and sculptor, a convicted murderer, a prison escapee and the presumed kidnapper of the wife of the assistant warden of the prison from which he escaped in 1994. Today, he is the star of a bizarre mystery that ended Monday night after almost 11 years when federal, Oklahoma and Texas authorities found him in a mobile home, three miles off the nearest paved road in rural East Texas. Dial was sauteing steak for supper and, according to one official, said: "I had been thinking of when they were going to catch me. I had been looking for it, but I never saw this coming."

On Wednesday, Dial, 60, was back in Oklahoma, held in the maximum-security penitentiary in McAlester. Bobbi Parker, 42, the woman he reportedly abducted when he escaped from the Oklahoma State Reformatory in Granite and who was found on the property outside the mobile home, was reunited with her husband. Randy Parker is now the warden of the William S. Key Correctional Center in Fort Supply.

Dial's story is that he held Parker against her will -- under threat of death -- for more than 10 years.

"She was living under the impression that if she ever tried to get away, I would get away and I would make her regret it, particularly towards her family," Dial told reporters gathered at the Shelby County Jail in Texas on Tuesday, several hours after his arrest.

"I didn't mean it, but she didn't know that. . . .," Dial said. "I'm not workin' you. I'm just telling you I know what I'm capable of. I'm not capable of that, but she didn't know that."

Greer County District Attorney John Wampler, whose office will prosecute Dial on a prison escape charge, has ordered an investigation.

"We will be looking at all the facts surrounding this matter . . . to find out what actually occurred and what happened," the Oklahoma prosecutor said. "It would appear that kidnapping charges against Mr. Dial would be appropriate," he said. "Whether there's any reason to charge Ms. Parker with anything, I won't know until the investigation is complete."

He said Parker told authorities this week that she had been kidnapped and held against her will. Neither Parker nor her husband could be reached today.

The family reportedly got a call from Parker the night she disappeared, and a friend got a call from her a day later. In 2000, the FBI announced a $25,000 reward for information leading to Dial or Parker.

At the time of her abduction, Parker was running an inmate pottery program with Dial at the prison, where her husband then worked as assistant warden. As a trusty, Dial lived in minimum-security housing outside the prison walls; the Parkers and their two daughters lived in housing on the prison grounds.

The author of the true-crime book "At Large," which was based on Dial's case, does not believe the story that Parker had been forced to stay with Dial since 1994. Charles W. Sasser, a writer and a former Tulsa homicide detective, spoke to Dial and Parker by telephone in 2001, three years after "At Large" was published. Dial called him, Sasser said, to say he had read the book 12 times and to note that "you weren't always complimentary to me, but you were always fair and objective."

Sasser asked about Parker, and Dial said she was fine and put her on the phone. Sasser said he asked three questions to which only Parker would have known the answers and was satisfied that he was talking to the right woman. He said he asked how she was and urged her to call her family and let them know she was alive. "She said, 'I'm fine and I'm happy,' and . . . she said she wondered if it was better to let them [her family] keep thinking she was dead or to call them," Sasser said. He said he spoke to Dial for about an hour and called the FBI afterward. FBI attempts to trace Dial's call were unsuccessful, Sasser said.

Authorities were led to Dial and Parker this week by a tip generated by the TV show "America's Most Wanted," which featured the case. The two had been running a chicken farm in Campti, near the Louisiana border, for the past 5 1/2 years. They lived in a two-bedroom trailer in the woods. Dial told authorities he rarely ventured off the property. Instead, he sent Parker on errands to nearby Center, including to the town's grocery store, across the street from the Shelby County Sheriff's Office.

"We're looking across the highway at the store," Chief Deputy Kent Shaffer said. "She could have driven in here instead. We sure would have helped her out, I guarantee you."

 
 

Escaped Oklahoma Killer Randolph Dial Found

April 6, 2005

Several years ago, a new couple moved into a mobile home on a wooded lot in Campti, Texas, a small town near the Louisiana Border. As the years passed, residents of Campti began to feel that there was something not quite right about the pair. They kept to themselves in their secluded trailer, raising their chickens. They were not social with the locals, which was unusual for this small community.

Early this month the residents of Campti found out why their neighbors had been so aloof. Someone surfing the "America's Most Wanted" web site saw a familiar face. Based on a tip from the AMW fan, law enforcement officers entered the mobile home and found Randolph Franklin Dial .

Over fifteen years ago, Randolph Dial had been sentenced to life imprisonment by Judge Clifford E. Hopper of the District Court of Tulsa County for the murder of Kelly Hogan, an Oklahoma karate instructor, in 1981. Dial confessed to the murder, claiming it was a contract killing and that he was hired by the mob.

While in prison Dial, a renowned sculptor and painter who holds a masters degree in art, obtained trusty status allowing him to stay outside the prison walls with only minimum security. On August 30, 1994, Dial escaped taking with him Bobbi Parker, the wife of a deputy warden of the prison.

Parker, whom residents of Campti had known as "Sam", was found shortly after Dial's re-arrest tending chickens in a nearby farm. Though initially it appeared that Parker did not wish to return to her family, more recent reports indicated that she was kept captive against her will and never reported Dial in fear for her family's safety. Parker and her husband Randy had an emotional reunion on Tuesday.

 
 

Inmate, Warden's Wife Found 10 Years Later

April 5, 2005

By Richard Green (AP)

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) - A convicted murderer and a deputy warden's wife who disappeared nearly 11 years ago have been found living together and raising chickens in Texas. The woman said she was held captive the whole time, staying with the killer out of fear her family would be harmed if she fled.

Bobbi Parker, 42, was reunited with her husband Tuesday as authorities tried to piece together details of the strange case. "It looked like a husband and wife who hadn't seen each other in 11 years," Texas Ranger Tom Davis of the emotional reunion.

A tip generated by the TV show "America's Most Wanted" led law enforcement to a mobile home in Campti, Texas, where escaped convict Randolph Dial was arrested Monday, said FBI agent Salvador Hernandez. Parker was found a short time later working at a nearby chicken farm; the two were living under assumed names in the trailer outside Campti, a tiny town near the Louisiana border.

Parker and her husband Randy have two daughters, who were 8 and 10 at the time of the disappearance. The family still lives in Oklahoma, where the escape occurred.

Tanya Joy Parker, the sister of Randy Parker, said the two children did not make the trip to Texas. "They are elated, but after 10 years you'd be a little stunned," she said.

Sheriff Newton Johnson had said that Bobbi Parker wanted to stay on the chicken farm, but Hernandez said this was a misinterpretation. Hernandez said that while it is unusual for someone to be held against one's will for so long, it is not unprecedented.

"There have been cases of this kind and typically this will result when someone believes family members might be in danger," Hernandez said.

The FBI continued to question Bobbi Parker on Tuesday in Texas.

Residents of Campti thought something wasn't quite right about the pair over the years. They kept to themselves, never engaged in any personal conversations and avoided going to the nearby town of Center. Their trailer is secluded, near a red dirt road and sitting on a wooded lot across from five long metal chicken houses.

"We just thought they might have a couple of warrants or something," said Renae Almaguer, who once worked at a convenience store where the couple shopped for beer, cigarettes, gas and quick groceries. She said she told co-workers "something ain't right with them people."

Dial, a sculptor and painter, was convicted of the 1981 murder of a karate instructor. He had obtained trusty status at the Oklahoma State Reformatory, and he ran an inmate pottery program with Bobbi Parker and had access to the couple's home during the day in staff housing on prison grounds.

Bobbi Parker's mother received a phone call from her the night of the 1994 disappearance traced to Hurst, Texas. "I can't talk now," she said, crying. "I'm OK. Tell the kids I'll see them soon."

A day later, she made a second call, this time from Fort Worth to a friend. It was the last message her family got from her. "Tell the kids I love them and I'll be home soon," she said.

In a jailhouse interview with reporters Tuesday, Dial, 60, said he took Parker at knifepoint when he escaped.

"I was a hostage-taker and will probably live to regret it," Dial said. "But now I don't. Doing a life sentence, at my age, I wouldn't trade it for the past 10 1/2 years."

Dial said their relationship was never romantic and that they lived in separate rooms. He likened Parker's relationship to him as "Stockholm Syndrome," where kidnapping victims become sympathetic to their captors over time, often out of fear of violence.

"She was living under the impression if she ever tried to get away, I would get away and I would make her regret it, particularly toward her family," Dial said. "I didn't mean it, but she didn't know that."

But some residents said if the woman they knew as "Sam" was being threatened, she didn't act like it.

Almaguer said Parker regularly came into the store by herself to cash Dial's payroll check. She said clerks sometimes told her the bank would cash it for her, but Parker would say she was too busy, or didn't want to make the two-mile drive to town.

When Parker did go to town to shop at the main grocery store, she wore a straw gardener's hat - pulled tightly to her head with a scarf - and a baggy dress, Almaguer said. She said people would laugh at how she looked, as if she was in disguise, Almaguer said.

Charles Sasser, a former Tulsa homicide detective who wrote a book about Dial, said the escaped inmate called him in 2001. Sasser also said he spoke with Bobbi Parker, and heard nothing from either one to indicate Parker was held against her will.

"I don't believe it," he said. "I spoke to her and told her to call her children."

Sasser notified the FBI, but agents were unable to determine where the Dial call came from.

Dial said he lived in other Texas towns, including Houston, before moving to Campti. The sheriff estimated Dial had lived in the area about five years.

"Being a small, rural East Texas area, I guess it felt like a good place to be," he said.

 
 

Federal Bureau of Investigation

April 4, 2005

OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLAHOMA -- Salvador Hernandez, Special Agent in Charge of the Federal Bureau of Investigation in Oklahoma, announced the arrest of Randolph Franklin Dial and the safe recovery of Bobbi Parker.

Based on a tip received by Orange County Texas District Attorney's Office from a viewer of America's Most Wanted, it was determined that Randolph Franklin Dial and Bobbi Parker may be living in a residence located approximately 10 miles east of Center, Texas, in the community of Camp Ti, in Shelby County.

At approximately 6:25 p.m. today, Texas Rangers, Investigators from the Orange County District Attorney's Office, Shelby County Sheriff and Deputies and FBI Agents entered the trailer believed occupied by Dial and Parker. Upon entry, Dial was immediately taken into custody without incident. A loaded pistol was found on top of a nearby table.

Parker was located a few minutes later while working at a chicken ranch. Early indications are that Parker was kidnaped and held against her will by Dial. Dial is in custody at the Shelby County Jail.

Dial was convicted of the 1981 murder of a karate instructor in Broken Bow, Oklahoma. On August 30, 1994, Dial, an inmate at the Oklahoma State Reformatory in Granite, Oklahoma, and Parker turned up missing. On September 1, 1994, Dial was charged with Violation of Title 18, USC, Section 1073, Unlawful Flight to Avoid Confinement. A Federal arrest warrant was issued out of the Western District of Oklahoma. Neither Dial nor Parker had been seen since that time. Dial's escape and Parker's subsequent disappearance have been featured many times on America's Most Wanted, Unsolved Mysteries and A Current Affair.

 
 

Randolph Franklin Dial:

Randolph Franklin Dial was born on September 26, 1944 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. After suffering from a lengthy illness, Randolph Dial died on June 13, 2007 at the maximum-security penitentiary in McAlester, Oklahoma.

Dial had three marriages:

  • Christina Dial: Christina lived in Mexico City. They had one son, Alexis Franklin Osborn born in 1978. The couple divorced in late 1978. In 1998, in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Alexis Osborn was charged in connection with his live-in girlfriend's death.

  • Mary Katherine Dial: Katherine and Randy Dial married in 1979 and divorced in 1983. They had one daughter, Rose. Katherine lived in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. She was killed while Randolph Dial was in prison.

  • Robin Dial: Robin and Randolph Dial were married in 1983. They divorced in 1986. They had one son, Perry. Robin lived in Emporia, Kansas and in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Randolph Dial was an artist, sculptor, and convicted murderer of the September 16, 1981, Tulsa, Oklahoma, murder of a karate instructor, Kelly Dean Hogan. He escaped from the Oklahoma State Reformatory in Granite, Oklahoma on August 30, 1994

marriage.about.com/od/celebritymarriages

 
 

SEX: M RACE: W TYPE: N MOTIVE: CE

MO: Alcoholic sculptor and confessed contract killer; also claimed antidrug vigilante murders.

DISPOSITION: Life term on one count in Okla., 1986; escaped from prison with deputy warden's wife (presumed kidnap victim), 1989; captured 2005.

 

 

 
 
 
 
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